The good, the bad, the bias


it's not hard to have a go-to brand or store. good results typically lead to loyalty. what about the negatives, either through experience or impression or snobbery.

without naming names, are there thresholds you will not cross, brands you will not consider? is this limiting, do you think?

20 comments:

jakjak said...

I don't go near Calvin Klein since he was once quoted as saying that he won't make clothes above size 10 because he doesn't want fat women wearing his stuff

editor said...

jakjak - okay, that is naming names, but...roflmao, if he said that...what a fool. there is another post i had that is more related to your point - whether a designer could do or say something that might turn you off of their work. let me look for it.

editor said...

found it here.

editor said...

my answer to today's post is yes and yes (and no). yes i have places i wouldn't deign to patronize. yes it is limiting, but it is also helpful i suppose. i mean if there were no limits, no boundaries, i might go insane.

Iheartfashion said...

As I've said before, I find Dov Charney a real turn-off, so I won't shop at American Apparel despite my approval of their anti-sweatshop ethos, but I don't consider it any great loss. I can find cheap t-shirts at so many other places.

Mademoiselle said...

I leave the high street alone.

TravelGretta said...

Why can't I name names? I actually like some of Jessica Simpson's shoe styles, but cannot bring myself to buy them. Which is kind of silly. But I just can't. Which is absolute snobbery of me. The same with J.Lo.

Michelle said...

I try to avoid the big box mass retailers (the type with "mart" in the name, etc...) It was imprinted in me when I was young by my mother that the quality of goods is probably inferior, and now that I'm older, I'm more apt to be concerned about whether the cheap prices come from poor labor practices.

Carlene said...

Yep, same with me on the "marts". But my reasons are less thoughtful...I just hate it in there. The vibe is so noxious, I think they have something they pump into the air in their stores that eats brain cells. It would explain A LOT.

ambika said...

Bad customer service will generally lead me to never purchase from a store again. Same thing with bad quality. If a tee pills after 2 washes, I'd be an idiot to go back, wouldn't I.

And as much as I shouldn't, I find myself totally agreeing with the comment about Jessica Simpson.

Iheartfashion said...

Agreed on the Jessica Simpson, JLo, and pretty much any other actress/celebrity line; perfume from Paris Hilton or Britney Spears? Wouldn't buy it no matter how good it smelled! And Walmart, I boycott for numerous reasons: they sell guns, but censor their CDs; not to mention their notoriously poor labor practices and the general ugliness of the stores.

Candid Cool said...

oh i'm naming names. im with iheart, i dont jump on the american apparel train, no Abercrombie too many negative high school association, oh yeah and the racism, and no Jessica Simpson for me either, and I refuse to wear Steve Madden too

fashionaddict said...

I was in the UK, and highly disturbed by one high street store in particular known for their low, low prices and copies of what's on trend now..it made me uneasy because of all the rumours about sweatshop labour.

And there are some shops I don't go into except to have a laugh at the clothes because they're so consistently hideous...

And I skip some shops because the prices are pretty steep but the designs and quality are uninspiring, I hate shops that are selling status, not good clothing.

Sisty said...

Frederick's of Hollywood.

Allie said...

I too won't shop WalMart because of thier ethics and practices. I will also stay away from other copmpanies who I know have such obviously bad practices.

I also stay away from stores that I feel are too young or old for me - if my mom or my 15-year old neighbor shops there I do feel foolish entering. But then I will see a great top on a friend and she'll admit it came from a store like that and it tempts me to visit but I usually don't just because of time and effort (and I guess the snobbery factor - don't really want to admit my frock came from an old lady/bubble gum teen locale).

landis smithers said...

this is a tough one for me.

i'm working on a brand some people love, some people have grown out of, and some people hate. largely because of a mix of product drifting to bad, cheesy marketing (in the past, people, in the past!), and bad service. as we try to change all that in this year, i learn people are more forgiving of a brand than you would think (one good experience is sometimes all it takes), more eager for options, and more susceptible to marketing than even i thought (now, if we get cool product in store, we're pretty much done)

and I don't shop at my own brand much. i'm waiting for product to really turn around, and just cherry picking each collection for now.

a. said...

at first i thought, no, not REALLY, but then reading through everyone's posts, i realized that i am much like many of the other posters! totally agree on the jessica simpson thing. i mean, the truth is, i can find similarly cute shoes made by other reasonably-priced shoe brands (nine west is sickeningly cute this fall) and at least that way i'm not helping to fill the coffers of an already-too-rich celeb. same with celeb perfumes... i don't know what i would do if the next britney spears perfume that came out actually smelled good. i found myself not smelling the recent hilary duff perfume (on a mag scent strip) because i was worried of the same!! ridiculous, it is.

also agree about being grossed out by dov of a. apparel, and turned off by abercrombie. i will still walk through the stores i don't like periodically to see if anything catches my eye, and nothing ever has. i don't however, have problems shopping at stores for teens. and the marts, i love. i grew up with a family that loved them, so i suppose it's partially conditioned in me. a good deal of my wardrobe comes from target.

to those saying they don't shop at the marts because of labor issues - i must say, i have a hard time believing that there's much of a difference in terms of labor practices between a target made-in-china and a high-end-boutique/dept-store made-in-china tag. i don't know this for sure - does anyone? all's i know is, almost all clothing i look at nowadays is made in china. it's almost inescapable.

a. said...

ps. landis, are you talking of the gap? i hope so! i would LOVE to see the gap make a comeback. i can still remember my most memorable pieces of clothing from there - a turtleneck i had when i was a kid that lasted me oh, i don't know, 6+ years, NEVER got worn out... and a cotton canvas bomber jacket that i wore to death and then lost about a year ago which i still mourn. you are right about a brand's resiliency - if the gap made a good comeback i would be there in a heartbeat.

Anonymous said...

Well, I'll try to stay in the spirit of the post. I stay away from "pajamatized" brands. I'm older (mid-40s) and in no way have a model's figure (think Jennifer Hudson w/smaller breasts and less of a stomach), but I do have a defined figure and like tailoring, princess lines, etc.

editor said...

anonymous - "spirit of the post" - thank you. :)
your aversions are driven solely by the product?

(ps "mid-40s" means you're older than some, yes, and younger than some!)