The same, but different


i've entered stores to pursue an item in a window display, only to to discover that pins holding back fabric give a dress or top the perfect shape. i've seen tape and clips work magic for photo shoots. i've seen software erase lines and minimize thighs.

do you mind?

12 comments:

enc said...

I mind. I think it's sort of dishonest. What do you think?

Carlene said...

It's part of my job (Photoshop), and I *still* mind. And so did one of my bosses, after I gave him a receding hairline. Not so "magical" anymore.

Everyday Sewist said...

I mind. I especially mind it when it's used on catalog pages where you can't see the true shape of the garment.

And I think that woman looks better pre-Photoshop.

editor said...

lol, carlene, i hope you never get ahold of a picture of me. maybe you could photoshop my sketches though. ;)

enc - i feel like at this stage in the game, it's so obvious, that i'm not effected by it. that is, i don't turn a page without a heaping tablespoon of salt. a fried mentioned to me that magazines make her feel like she should make more of an effort, should attempt the level of slick-ness featured in them. i've seen celebs and models in person and they don't live/look that way. it's a fairytale book. as long as the reader has their eyes wide open, it's harmless, and i guess i would rather look at beauty than reality, BUT i never try to compare myself to the page. the one place i take umbrage is cosmetics. there they are specifically promising results that are not available, and it is deceitful. if vogue wants a photoshoot to look a certain way, fine, but if estee lauder is going to A. use 16yo models to hawk wrinkle cream and then B. photoshop out the bags and lines courtesy of late nights and cigarettes, which their products themselves could not conceal, that is just false advertising and it really really irks me.
so if it pertains to the truth of a product, i'm anti-. if it's used to create an illusion in order to maintain a certain atmosphere (fiction), where they promise nothing but escapism, i'm fine with it.

editor said...

ah, everyday sewist, same idea. yes, i've seen a skirt be dealt with for an ad, where it was tweaked to look like it hung differently than it did. that is, i agree, wrong.
and regarding ms. murphy's face here - a good policy might be simply to not take anyone's picture this close up. ;) it makes me think of swifts' description of the lilliputs' response to gulliver's giant pores, etc.

Paul Pincus said...

I don't mind.

K.Line said...

In a word, yes.

Is that Britney Murphy? Whoever it is, I think she looks better before the touch-up - less alien creature. K

Iheartfashion said...

It used to part of my job too, Photoshopping off teenage zits. I don't mind it used that way, to erase a blemish or even out skin tone, but slimming arms and legs of celebrities on covers (which is always really obvious), disappoints me. I feel like the clothes should be represented the way they actually hang, and people should look their actual size and shape. Flattering camera angles and makeup are great, but Photoshopping off 20lbs...no.
On a side note: I read that more and more school photographers are now offering photo retouching, and parents are having their 10-year olds "improved", which is really terrible.

enc said...

I guess I agree that using young girls to advertise wrinkle cream is pushing it to the outer limits. Creating and maintaining fantasy in photo shoots is great.

And your expression "i don't turn a page without a heaping tablespoon of salt" is genius.

coco said...

No I don't mid, I'd rather see Britanny Murphy wrinkle free

landis smithers said...

on our latest campaign, we didn't retouch the girls in the television, which threw everyone for a loop. of course, we color corrected to make the outfits look the same as they do to the natural eye, and took a pimple off a girl's face, but left the freckles, smile lines, moles, glowy skin, stray hair. . . it worked out great. of course they're all twenty. and models. so take it with a grain of salt. again.

LC, that girl said...

I TOTALLY MIND! It's such a false sense of fashion reality! I hate it when they pin back dresses!