Occupied


1. if you were planning on attending a meeting filled exclusively with men,
how would it affect how you dressed?

2. if you were planning on attending a meeting filled exclusively with women,
how would it affect how you dressed?

16 comments:

Iheartfashion said...

I don't think I'd dress any differently for the two meetings.

-h of candid cool said...

me neither

greying pixie said...

editor - do you mean effect or affect?

editor said...

greying pixie: effect - "The power to produce an outcome or achieve a result; influence" - effect.
e.g. The government's action had no effect on the trade imbalance.

materfamilias said...

I don't think the gender makeup would affect my choice. (the "effect" you're citing from the dictionary definition is a noun; the verb you want here, I believe, is "affect" (although one can say that a meeting's composition can "effect" -- bring about -- a change, that's a slightly different usage) Sorry to be so pedantic; it's a vocational hazard ;-)

editor said...

i suppose with my original sentence construction, i cannot use it as a transitive verb - though it can be used as one, and is not exclusively a noun.
*sigh* i will make the change. but materfamilias, i appreciate that you did answer the question. :)

materfamilias said...

oh dear, I'd actually just come back to delete any evidence of pedantic, English prof behaviour, and now I find I'm too late. I've surely set myself up for my future grammatical errors to be spotted by editorially-talented fashionistas everywhere!
(And you're absolutely right that "effect" can be used quite, um, effectively as a verb)

Sal said...

Haha, a provocative gender question causes us to quibble about grammar.

To a meeting of all dudes, I would wear something that made me feel confident and secure - likely tight-fitting clothes, but in conservative cuts and thick fabrics. Not a lot of exposed skin, and I'd wear my hair slicked back. I feel most powerful and least likely to be intimidated then. I'm not generally *afraid* of rooms full of dudes, but I'd want to make sure I felt polished, elegant, and in-control.

For an all-gal meeting, I'd probably go much more casual. Again, no short skirts or low-cut tops. I'd probably wear looser pants and a clean-cut sweater.

With men, I would want to project an image of unintimidatABLE-ness. With women, I would want to project an image of unintimidatING-ness.

Might sound like I'm succumbing to antiquated gender roles, but I'm just being honest.

greying pixie said...

I too am sorry to be pedantic. I only asked the question originally as, coming from the UK, I wanted to check that I understood the question. For all I knew it may have had a different meaning in the States. I mean - take your and my meaning of 'pants' for example!

So on with the questions:

In both cases it would affect my choice of clothing not at all. I've long given up on playing those gender games, I now dress to please myself, which usually gets many compliments from men and women, both gay and straight.

The fact that it is a meeting is what is important to me, not the gender or sexuality of the colleagues present.

dreamecho said...

ha! i attend meetings filled exclusively with men on a weekly basis!

such are the stakes (or perks) of being an engineer in an especially male-dominated sub-field. but, to answer the question, i agree with greying pixie's last line: "The fact that it is a meeting is what is important to me, not the gender or sexuality of the colleagues present." what i wear really depends more on the industry and seriousness of the meeting. when we have in-house meetings (all men), i wear my normal workwear, which ranges from the plainest and simplest outfits to the fun and quirky (but never over the top). meanwhile, when i have meetings with other companies (again, usually all men), i scale down and do actual business casual or a suit.

editor said...

ha ha, thought you could sneak in and delete did you?!
though you really have to cut a jetlagged girl some slack, all comments, pedantic or not, are welcome here.

Anonymous said...

I wouldn't - and don't - dress any differently. working in a technical, male-dominated profession means that most of the meetings I ever attend are populated predominantly by men.

xo

sabina

enc said...

I'd dress conservatively for both meetings, the idea being that I would hope attention would be focused on my ideas vs. my body parts.

greying pixie said...

But I think dressing conservatively doesn't necessarily mean that body parts cannot be highlighted. One of my favourite winter dresses is a floor length grey felted wool dress, flaring out from the top down to the feet with two enormous pockets so that my body shape does not show at all. However it fits me beautifully on the shoulders and has a round jewel neck which is extremely flattering. Conservative like a nun, but, somehow I feel so confident (dare I say attractive?) in it because I know I am not exposing any flesh, and yet at the same time attention is drawn to my shoulders and neck and face. Oh, I'm really so happy to have passed the age of feeling a need to display!

greying pixie said...

But I think dressing conservatively doesn't necessarily mean that body parts cannot be highlighted. One of my favourite winter dresses is a floor length grey felted wool dress, flaring out from the top down to the feet with two enormous pockets so that my body shape does not show at all. However it fits me beautifully on the shoulders and has a round jewel neck which is extremely flattering. Conservative like a nun, but, somehow I feel so confident (dare I say attractive?) in it because I know I am not exposing any flesh, and yet at the same time attention is drawn to my shoulders and neck and face. Oh, I'm really so happy to have passed the age of feeling a need to display!

Luce said...

Being straight and single, i'd put more thought into being attractive for the men one and more fashion-y for the womens. In saying that i would probably end up with the same outfit on, no matter which one i was attending!